You have reached a collection of archived material.

The content available is no longer being updated and may no longer be applicable as a result of changes in law, regulation and/or administration. If you wish to see the latest content, please visit the current version of the site.

For persons with disabilities experiencing difficulties accessing content on archive.defense.gov, please use the DoD Section 508 Form. In this form, please indicate the nature of your accessibility issue/problem and your contact information so we can address your issue or question.

Skip navigation links


Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates, left, speaks during a joint media roundtable with Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Navy Adm. Michael Mullen in the Pentagon Briefing Room, Oct. 18, 2007.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen responds to a question from a soldiers assigned to the Warrior Transition Unit at Irwin Army Community Hospital, Fort Riley, Kan., Oct. 24, 2007. Mullen was on a two-day tour of Army bases in Oklahoma, Kansas and Colorado, his first domestic trip as Chairman since taking over the position, Oct 1,. 2007.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen answers questions at an all hands call with Command and General Staff College students, Fort Levenworth, Ks., Oct. 23, 2007.
Banner Image:  Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, New Chairman Lays Out Top Priorities
Priority 1

To develop a military strategy tied to our national vital interests in the Middle East that certainly includes Iraq and Afghanistan, but looks beyond them as well. 

U.S. Must Take ‘Long View'

WASHINGTON, Oct. 26, 2007 – Navy Adm. Michael G. Mullen’s top priority as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff is to widen the scope of U.S. military strategy to look beyond the borders of Iraq and Afghanistan and strengthen security partnerships. Story

Priority 2

To reset, reconstitute, and revitalize our forces, especially the soldiers and Marines comprising our ground forces who have been pushed very hard over the last several years.

Mullen Pledges to Relieve Strain

WASHINGTON, Oct. 26, 2007 – U.S. ground forces are not broken, but they are capable of breaking, the military's highest-ranking officer said, while vowing to make relieving strains on troops a top priority.  Story

Priority 3

To properly balance global risk to help us maintain a position of leadership and preserve our freedom of action to counter the threat of transnational terrorism and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and associated technologies; to contend with regional instability, to deter aggressive

action by potentially hostile state actors, to help manage the growing competition for natural resources, to help mitigate the effects of natural disasters and pandemics; to take advantage of all the opportunities for international cooperation and progress our globalized world has to offer.

Chairman Identifies 'Tough Questions'

WASHINGTON, Oct. 26, 2007 - In his first public speech as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Navy Adm. Michael G. Mullen last night identified pressing questions the United States faces as it attempts to counter emerging threats while maintaining a position of leadership.

  • How can a violent extremist movement that increasingly targets the integrated nature of the largely globalized world be effectively eliminated in both the short and the long term?

  • How can the development of weapons of mass destruction by or the transfer of associated technologies to aggressive regimes and radical extremists like al Qaeda be prevented?

  • How can regional instability stemming from accelerating global integration, intense nationalist and religious movements, and the spread of technology throughout the world be mitigated and localized?

  • How can the United States military remain sufficiently capable to deter aggressive actions by nations like Iran, North Korea, and others who seek to expand their military capability?

  • How can countries like China and Russia be effectively engaged to ensure that their growing regional influence
  • translates to cooperative participation in the global economic system?

  • How will global industrialization, world population expansion, and migration affect the consumption rates, the distribution, and the long term availability of vital resources such as water and energy?

  • How will competition for those resources affect global stability, and what role will the military play in managing these risks?

  • How can the local, regional, and potentially global effects of another tsunami like the one that hit in the Indian Ocean Basin almost three years ago or another earthquake like the one that devastated parts of Pakistan in 2005 or another Hurricane Katrina or even the California wildfires that dominate the news today be mitigated?

  • What impact will a massive natural disaster or a global pandemic have throughout the world, and how can militaries work together to alleviate the shock to the global system?

  • How can we do all that is required of us and still remain good stewards of our nation's resources? Story

  • Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Adm. Mike Mullen answers questions at an all hands call with students assigned to the Captains Career course at Ft. Sill, Lawton, Okla., Oct. 23, 2007. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen answers questions at an all hands call with Command and General Staff College students, Ft. Levenworth, Ks., Oct. 23, 2007. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen greets service members at the conclusion of a town hall meeting at Fort Riley, Kan., Oct. 24, 2007.
    Travels with Mullen
    See caption to the right.
    During a two-day trip Oct. 23 to 25, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Navy Adm. Mike Mullen visited at Fort Sill, Okla., and Fort Riley and Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. American Forces Press Service Report Fred Baker III traveled with the chairman to report on his activities. His articles follow:
    Chairman Supports All-Volunteer Force
    Chairman Reaches Out to Ground-Force Troops
    Chairman Asks Straight Questions, Gets Hard Answers
    Chairman Starts Two-Day Trip to Visit Army Posts